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Displaying 105–120 (of 2427)

Title Date
Hadoop Heat: Cloudera, NetApp Strike At EMC

Summary
Cloudera, NetApp announce partnership that promises new flexibility for big data--and new competition for EMC's Hadoop plans.
11-07-2011
Best Buy acquires mindSHIFT for $167M, betting on the cloud

Summary
Electronics retailer Best Buy has become the latest business to take advantage of the burgeoning cloud services opportunity by reaching a deal to acquire managed service provider mindSHIFT Technologies for $167 million. By purchasing mindSHIFT, the retailer believes it will be able further grow its IT service opportunities for small and mid-sized businesses. Currently, the cloud provider serves over 5,400 customers and 25,000 managed desktops in major U.S. markets. Best Buy will leverage its well-known brand to sell mindSHIFT's managed service offerings via its retail stores, Geek Squad services and Best Buy For Business operations. "There's no question that acquiring the skills, capabilities and clients of mindSHIFT has the potential to help expand Best Buy's global services capabilities in the vast small and mid-sized business market," said George Sherman, senior vice president of Best Buy Services in a release announcing the deal. "As important, the mindSHIFT team will bring added experience, talent and resources to the remote support capability we have been building within our multi-channel tech service unit Geek Squad." When the deal is completed at the end of the year, mindSHIFT will continue to operate under its current name, management team and capabilities. The provider currently has a staff of 500 employees that reside in offices in major cities including Boston, Long Island, N.Y., Minneapolis, Morrisville, N.C., New York City, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. For more:- see the release - Data Center Knowledge has this article Related articles:Twin Valley Telephone enters cloud service game via ISG acquisitionWarwick Valley Telephone bolsters cloud, CLEC vision with $17M Alteva acquisitionWindstream taps into the burgeoning hybrid cloud opportunityVerizon beefs up data center power with Terremark purchase
11-07-2011
Practical Analysis: In Data Deduplication, Dell Surprises, EMC Lags

Summary
IT pros we surveyed rank Dell/Compellent high on value but ding EMC/Data Domain on value, flexibility, and features.
11-07-2011
Rackspace to Offer Support for Clouds in Other Data Centers

Summary
Rackspace will offer support services for OpenStack implementations running in enterprises or other data centers
11-07-2011
Your Wireless Carrier Probably is Selling Your Personal Information--but Does it Matter?

Summary
If we don't actively protect our own data, does it matter if big businesses sell our personal details?
11-07-2011
IBM Predicts Mobile Holiday Shopping Madness

Summary
Using its analytics resources, IBM predicts that this holiday season shoppers will use mobile devices more than ever to access retail sites. - IBM predicts that during this years hot November holiday season, an unprecedented 15 percent of people in the United States logging onto a retailers Website are expected to do so through a mobile device. IBM came to this conclusion based on cloud analytics findings from the companys cache of an...
11-05-2011
Do your compliance officials have it wrong?

Summary
If you sometimes feel as though the compliance officials in your organization don't quite get it when it comes to cloud security, recent survey data out of the Ponemon Institute indicates you're not alone. Compliance pros tend to view cloud service providers as more secure than IT believes them to be, reports Fahmida Y. Rashid at eWeek. The survey, which included more than 1,000 respondents in IT, information security, compliance and privacy, showed that the two sets of professionals tend to have different opinions on who is in charge of defining and handling security requirements for cloud computing. About 21 percent of the compliance pros said it is up to them to define the requirements, and 22 percent of the IT pros said that it is up to the business leaders. They both agreed, however, that enforcing the requirements falls to the business leaders. Compliance officials tend to be more optimistic than IT pros about the security delivered by service providers and the effectiveness of their organizations' own security policies. Almost half of the compliance pros said that on-premise data centers and infrastructure-as-a-service providers were equally secure, while just 33 percent of the IT pros see is that way. Forty-two percent of the compliance pros said their internal policies and procedures were sufficient for IaaS security, but only 34 percent of the IT pros felt the same way. Nobody, it seems, wants to take full ownership for cloud security, so the responsibilities are divided. "This makes it extremely difficult for organizations to implement an enterprise-wide data security strategy that incorporates protection for sensitive information in the cloud," said Richard Gorman, CEO of encryption provider Vormetric, which sponsored the survey. IT and compliance professionals also disagree on how best to secure data stored in the cloud, the survey found. IT experts said encryption should be used to protect data from the eyes of service providers, while compliance experts said encryption should be used primarily as a means of keeping IT administrators from seeing data they don't need. Either way, more than two-thirds of the respondents said that their organizations don't encrypt data in the cloud anyway. For more, see:- Fahmida Y. Rashid's article at eWeek Related Articles:Florida city uses security app for records in the cloudConsultant firm ranks cloud-computing vendors
11-04-2011
How to Scale Without Losing Savvy Customer Service

11-04-2011
Telecom's big hang-up

Summary
FORTUNE -- Back in the 20th century, selling phone calls to Americans seemed a practically perfect business, growing during good times and bad -- and turning AT&T into the nation's most widely held stock. Selling phone calls in the 21st century is proving a much uglier affair.
11-04-2011
Cincinnati Bell's IT, hardware and broadband focus pays off again in Q3

Summary
Cincinnati Bell (NYSE: CBB) Q3 earnings once again reflect the fact that its push to become a larger player in the managed services and broadband as its future wireline growth engines is paying off. Click here for details of Cincinnati Bell's Q3 2011 results. During the three months ended Sept. 30, the service provider reported net income of $17.6 million, or 7 cents a share, a 21 percent increase from the $14.5 million, or 6 cents a share, it reported in Q3 2010. Likewise, operating revenue was $86 million, up from $83 million a year ago, a figure that included an $8 million one-time gain from the sale of its home security business.    One of the big contributors to the positive results was a 26 percent increase in IT services and hardware sales, and an 18 percent increase in data center colocation revenue. On the traditional wireline side, the service provider saw its share of ups and downs with overall wireline revenue declining to $183 million. Local access lines declined from 650,600 in Q2 to 635,300 in Q3.   Despite the overall wireline losses, Cincinnati Bell continues to find new subscribers for its Fioptics entertainment service, adding 4,000 customers during the quarter. Buoyed by the debut of its IPTV service, the telco passed 25,000 additional homes and businesses with Fioptics during the quarter, bringing the total number of units passed to 115,000. By the end of Q4 2011, wireline expects to pass about 25,000 additional units. For the year 2011, the telco reconfirmed its guidance of $1.4 billion in revenue and adjusted EBITDA of $545 million. For more:- see the earnings release - here's FierceIPTV's take- Cincinnati.com has this article Earnings summary: Wireline in the third quarter 2011 Related articles:Cincinnati Bell employs Calix's C7 for its VDSL2 expansion effortCincinnati Bell sees data center business as foundation for cloud, managed servicesCincinnati Bell realigns top management to capitalize on growing data center businessCincinnati Bell's Q2 results get boost from data center service gains
11-04-2011
Senator Vows to Block FCC Nominees Over LightSquared

Summary
Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley wants the agency to answer questions about the satellite-LTE startup
11-04-2011
Wi-Fi Tethering 101: Use a Smartphone As a Mobile Hotspot

Summary
Buried inside many of the latest smartphones is a capability that few people take advantage of. A feature called tethering lets a phone go beyond talk, email and Web surfing to act as a mobile hotspot that can supply Web access to nearby computers, tablets and other devices.
11-04-2011
Customer Analytics Come To Real Stores

Summary
If you run a physical store -- remember them? -- you may have looked longingly at the kinds of analytics that your Web site, or your online competitors, may have enjoyed for years. Now, a new company is making a data analytics platform available for the real world, taking advantage of the fact that most store visitors carry a mobile phone with Wi-Fi enabled. On Thursday, Palo Alto, Calif.-based Euclid Elements announced its new platform, emerging from a stealth development period funded by venture capital. "To put it simply," said co-founder and CEO Will Smith in a statement, "we're Google Analytics for the physical world." Wi-Fi Within 60 Yards The Euclid platform uses sensors to map shopper traffic patterns in retail spaces, by tracking the position of customers' smartphones. The data includes numbers of unique visitors over given time periods, numbers of people walking by when the store is closed, new vs. repeat visitors, customer loyalty and frequency, the effectiveness of promotions in creating loyal customers, metrics between stores, average dwell time, and window conversion rates -- how many walked by vs. how many walked in. The sensors pick up Wi-Fi signals within 60 yards, and use that information as markers for the customers. The service runs about $200 monthly. The data can be used to help determine merchandising displays, the effectiveness of in-store specials, store layout and traffic flows, staffing and other aspects. The company said that the installation is quick and easy. Installation of sensors, it said, takes a couple of minutes, and then stores just need to log into their Web dashboard to view analytics. The company said that the data is secure, in that it is always hashed, encrypted, and sent over secure connections. No Personal Data Euclid said that no personal shopper data is collected, and that all data is anonymous...
11-03-2011
RIM's Market Cap Is Now Less Than The Total Value Of Its Assets (RIMM)

Summary
The stock market has spoken: Research In Motion has no future. Today, the stock's price briefly dropped below its book value of $18.92 per share, as calculated by Bloomberg. That's the value of its assets, including cash, patents, and real estate, minus its liabilities. That basically means that the market thinks RIM will shrink, not grow. The last time the stock price dipped below its market value was when RIM was losing money back in 2003.   Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.Join the conversation about this story »See Also:How Can You Market To Android And iPhone Users? Find Out TomorrowATTENTION APPLE FANS: Samsung Blowing Past Apple To Become The Biggest Smartphone Vendor Is Not Good NewsWhy I Finally Decided To Ditch The BlackBerry And Run Off With An iPhone
11-03-2011
Nielsen: Majority of younger Americans have a smartphone

Summary
Talk about a generational divide. While only 43 percent of all Americans with wireless service have a smartphone, the majority of younger Americans own such gadgets, according to new data from The Nielsen Company. According to Nielsen, 62 percent of adults with wireless service aged 25-34 report owning smartphones, and among those 18-24 and 35-44 years old the smartphone penetration rate is around 54 percent. In contrast, 40 percent of 45-54 year-olds reported owning a smartphone, as opposed to a more basic feature phone. Google's (NASDAQ:GOOG) Android remains the most popular smartphone platform in the United States according to Nielsen, with 43 percent of the market, while Apple is the top smartphone manufacturer, with 28 percent of smartphone consumers using an Apple iPhone. Post
11-03-2011

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