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Displaying 60–75 (of 2427)

Title Date
Article: Case Study: AT&T Empowers Employees for B2B Social Engagement

Summary
Social media team focuses on proactive marketing and relationship-building
11-17-2011
So you know your organization needs mobile--now what?

Summary
Guest post by Chad Udell Mobile is a hot topic nowadays when it comes to marketing, but businesses have just begun to realize the possibilities for implementing a mobile strategy for internal company usage. Many enterprise-level companies realize that there's value in using mobile for employee training as a standard tool for sales force usage, or a means to educate employees on new products before they go to market, or even how to provide checklists and other performance support applications and services, all of which can be referred to as "mobile learning." Getting one or two projects done as a pilot may not be difficult, but the key is getting businesses to sign off on mobile learning, and it's not a simple process. Defining, designing and implementing a mobile learning system within a large company is complex, costly and political. Yet, just like with any other new technology, it's the job of the CIO (or IT manager) to develop a compelling requirements analysis to make the business case for why the complexity and cost are worth it. A requirements analysis might not be a new concept in the IT department, but developing one with regard to mobile is most likely uncharted territory. So what's the best approach? Who are the stakeholders? Whenever a new technology is introduced to a company, there are usually multiple stakeholders who want to be--and should be--consulted during the process of gathering business requirements. These stakeholders typically include those who will use the system and those who have an interest in the technology succeeding within the organization. Stakeholders for mobile learning can include the following: Employees (Learners): all people receiving training in the organization Managers: managing directors, directors, sales managers, C-level executives Administrators: office administrators, HR staff, IT staff Partners: partners, vendors, suppliers Customers: clients and buyers of your products and services Always remember your stakeholders are critical in ensuring the adoption of mobile learning and can make decisions as representatives of larger groups and help communicate them. What are the stakeholders' business requirements? Once you've identified your stakeholders, it's time to gather their business requirements. These might be specific needs and requirements that come from each business unit involved, but all must be required. For that reason, it's best to break them down into categories: 1) Business and Enterprise: enterprise strategy and goals are applied to the mobile learning realm 2) Technology and Functionality: specifics about functional and technical requirements 3) Audience and External: can include demographic information, key learning objectives and job function information How do you address the business requirements with regard to mobile? The most challenging aspect of developing a mobile learning requirements analysis is addressing the business requirements that your stakeholders identify. Concerning business and enterprise requirements, here are some questions you need to be able to answer: What is the overall vision for the use of mobile learning within the company? What is the scope of the project? For instance, is it a pilot study? Will it be rolled out to specific groups or departments? Are all employees provided with mobile devices? What are the platforms you need to target and plan for? What are the requirements for how the content should look and feel, particularly with regard to navigation and presentation? What are the risks of implementing mobile learning within the company? What contingency plans can be made to cover these risks? Are certain levels of risk acceptable? Will the introduction of a mobile learning system within the company cause new problems among users? What are the steps necessary to develop the mobile learning system? Is there a schedule or project plan in place? Is a custom solution necessary, or are there commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solutions that might help build the mobile learning system? If so, how are they deployed and maintained? When will the company switch to the new mobile learning system? What procedures are necessary to make that happen? What happens to the old system? The technology and functionality requirements and constraints must also be fulfilled for the project to move ahead. Ensure that the technology is accessible to all, meets the company's security needs, and all security standards are adhered to. Safety, durability (under all circumstances) and specific IT requirements must also be met in this project. Legal requirements should also be considered--does the mobile learning system fall under the jurisdiction of any laws (privacy, civil rights, etc.)? Other important requirements to meet include: Naming conventions and definitions: These keep everyone on the same page in terms of understanding what's involved in mobile learning implementation. Functional and data: Describe how the new mobile learning system will actually work and what data are needed to make it useful. Usability: Make sure the mobile learning system is easy to learn and use. Performance: quick retrieval of information Maintainability and portability: Is the system sufficiently forward-compatible so that it can be updated? Is it documented? Once these aspects have been taken into account, it's time to consider the end users of mobile learning within the company as well as any external influences that may affect the project. This might include operational requirements--physical environment where the mobile learning system is utilized--along with cultural and political requirements within a company. Ensure all considerations are covered that might not have been, and of course that all documentation for users and administrators is completed correctly. You should recognize that as an IT professional, while the "end users" may be one of the final things you consider in this effort, they likely will be the first thing that a Learning and Development or HR team member/stakeholder will consider. Different departments have different priorities. Needless to say, the process of developing a requirements analysis for mobile learning is a difficult one. It requires more than one person internally, or possibly an outside consulting service that has experience in gathering, documenting and negotiating the final set of requirements. But planning for success and the documentation of this plan will launch your efforts to a great start and leave your competition in the rear-view mirror. Chad Udell is managing director at Float.
11-16-2011
Keys to a successful MDM project

Summary
Mobile device management is a burgeoning field, with more vendors--Google (NASDAQ: GOOG) and IBM (NYSE: IBM) most recently--peddling more tools all the time.Even so, the many different technologies are all much alike, and the real succes of an MDM project lies in your planning, processes, policies and enforcement,writes Michael A. Davis in a post at InformationWeek. Limiting IT involvement is a good place to start an MDM project, in Davis's view. A mobility council, consisting of "an odd number of people from a bunch of areas of the business, and with only one person representing IT," makes for a better managing entity. The council weighs in on policies, processes and applications, and the members inform the employees in their own areas of the organization. IT takes on the roles of translating technology terms into ones the business understands and figuring out how to minimize risks while promotingopportunity. Next you will want to determine who pays for the MDM technology, and make sure business units understand the logic behind a chargeback system if you implement one. Charging business units a per-year cost of the user licenses can reduce overall expense, as the units will be more inclined to carefully consider the need for the devices. One area whereMDM vendors differ is in the registration options they offer. Some have a self-service feature, whileothers require IT involvement. The less time and effort it takes to register devices, the more likely the management tools will be effective. "An enrollment process that is slow, complex, or otherwise painful will cause users to push back against loading the MDM client on their devices. This step is so important that failing at it could literally make or break your mobility plans," Davis cautions. Make sure you have a documented process for repairing or replacing mobile devices. If employees are using personal devices, they should get authorization before dropping it off at a supplier for a replacement. "This is a major issue for many organizations, as most users are accustomed to just stopping by an AT&T store and replacing a phone. Without a process, your sensitive corporate data just went into a bin in the carrier's back room," he writes. Finally, make sure that your encryption policy is consistent with compliance requirements and that the MDM system's capability aligns with it. For more:- see Michael A. Davis's post at InformationWeek Related Articles:A road map for mobility through 2020Shopping for mobile apps for businessTen-year forecast for enterprise mobility: Complicated
11-16-2011
First look: Oracle NoSQL Database

Summary
Oracle's take on the distributed key-value data store is fast, flexible, and enterprise-grade serious
11-16-2011
Analytics, Mobile Apps Are Hot, Hot, Hot

Summary
It's clear by the increasing use of analytics software that companies are struggling to get their hands around the huge amounts of data it takes to run a successful business. But developing social, mobile, cloud computing and other applications are also driving the need for new technical skills.
11-16-2011
Note To Cablecos: Own The Home Network

Summary
Home isnt just where the heart is -- Its where the future growth of the cable industry lies. At least thats what attendees at yesterdays opening general session gleaned from the comments of Pat Esser, president at Cox Communications, and Sanjay Jha, chairman and CEO of Motorola...
11-16-2011
AT&T, Verizon carry most U.S. business traffic, but competitors gain ground

Summary
A new comScore report says that 20 percent of all U.S.-based, browser-based business Internet traffic as of September 2011 came from AT&T (NYSE: T). Not far behind Ma Bell were Verizon (NYSE: VZ) with a 12 percent share and CenturyLink (NYSE: CTL), which got a boost from its acquisition of Qwest in April, as the third largest ISP with a 7 percent share. As a whole, the top five largest business ISPs drove almost 50 percent of the U.S. business Internet traffic. Source: ComScore Although the market is dominated by three top providers, Greg Mishkin, comScore vice president of telecom and wireless, is quick to point out that one of the unique attributes of the business market is that "even with smaller carriers contributing only a fraction of the traffic delivered by top carriers, the business ISP market is still more competitive than the residential ISP market." Mishkin added that while AT&T and Verizon dominate the large business market, "The small business segment is even more competitive among ISPs, highlighting the need for providers to develop strong marketing strategies to ensure they can retain and grow market share." Driven by the entrance of a number of CLECs and cable operators, the SMB market continues to be the most competitive business ISP market, with about 40 percent of traffic being driven by service providers that aren't in the top 10 carrier list. And even though AT&T dominates the SMB market, its 13 percent market share is much lower than what it commands in the medium and large business segments. Comcast (Nasdaq: CMCSA) and Verizon were the second and third largest players with a respective 8 and 7 percent market share. From a local market perspective, AT&T held the top position as of September 2011, while Verizon led three of the top 10 markets, including New York. In the SMB segment, Comcast and AT&T ranked as the top ISPs in four of the top 10 local markets, while Verizon and Cablevision (NYSE: CVC) both led in one local market. What these numbers suggest is that as many SMBs near the end of their contracts with larger providers, they are increasingly looking at alternative players like regional CLECs or cable operators to get their service. For more:- see the release Related articles:AT&T U-verse, IP business services drove Q3 2011 wireline growthVerizon's Q3 wireline story driven by consumer, business gainsCenturyLink Q3: Doubles operating revenues, increases broadband subscribers
11-15-2011
The Future of IPTV

Summary
CHR's Jerry Weber discusses IPTV game-changers and emerging trends for successful IPTV implementation
11-15-2011
GPS on the Run?

Summary
The Supreme Court earlier this month heard arguments on a relatively common drug case, but there is a chance for this case to set the groundwork, for good or ill, on resolving most of the issues I discussed recently regarding the murky state of privacy protections from the government in the United States.
11-15-2011
Infonetics: SBC market a $1B business by 2015; Acme Packet top vendor

Summary
Talk about dominating... new research from Infonetics shows that 96 percent of service providers asked to pick the top two global SBC vendors named Acme Packet (Nasdaq: APKT), and 26 percent of respondents named only the Bedford, Mass.-based company. Infonetics Research, in its recently released "SBC Deployment Strategies: Global Service Provider Survey," also said the SBC market, grew 45 percent in 2010 to $271 million, as IP voice traffic continued to grow. The segment should hit $1 billion by 2015, Infornetics said, driven by fixed-mobile convergence and wireless access. "Though traditionally deployed in fixed-line networks for residential and business VoIP service access (including trunking), the use of session border controllers for interconnection between service providers continues to expand as the world's voice networks increasingly go all-IP," said Diane Myers, directing analyst for VoIP and IMS at Infonetics Research. "Our latest survey confirms that two of the biggest growth areas for new SBC deployments over the next two years are fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) and wireless access." The research firm said SIP trunking is the No. 1 SBC application used by service providers and will continue to be through 2013, followed by interconnecting to other service providers and residential VoIP. For more: - see this release Related articles: Research: Interoperability issues still hold back SIP trunking adoption Metaswitch jumps into crowded SBC market; Mitel will stick with single-tier model SBC market heats up in Q2, attracts new vendors Acme Packet E-SBCs integrated in to HP's UC solutions Acme Packet expands SBC lead with new PLDT deal
11-14-2011
Sprint wants to increase wholesale customers by 10%

Summary
Sprint Nextel (NYSE:S) plans to increase the number of wholesale customers by 10 percent over the next year, a senior executive said. In an interview with Bloomberg, Matt Carter, president of Sprint Wholesale Solutions and New Ventures, said the company is accelerating its push into the wholesale business and is providing more services to its wholesale customers. Sprint currently has around more than 100 wholesale customers, representing 6.3 million subscribers.Sprint's total customer base is53 million. The focus on wholesale, in addition to Sprint's emphasis on its prepaid brands such as Assurance Wireless, indicate thatthe carrier increasesis lookingbeyond postpaidsubscribers to grow itsbusiness. Carter said Sprint is offering its wholesale customers services such asbilling, marketing support and competitive analysis, rather than just selling them capacity. "We are kind of a factory that produces these capabilities," he said. Some of Sprint's most high-profile wholesale customers include Leap Wireless (NASDAQ:LEAP) and Best Buy, as well as smaller players such as Credo Mobile, Liberty Wireless and PlatinumTel. Wholesale has become an increasingly critical part of Sprint's business. Sprint added a net of 835,000 wholesale and affiliate subscribers in the third quarter, nearly double the 441,000 retail subscribers it added. That was a stark reversal from the third quarter last year when wholesale additions trailed Sprint's branded customers.Sprint said in August it would start wholesaling Clearwire's (NASDAQ:CLWR) mobile WiMAX network to other companies, one of the resultsof arevised wholesale agreement the two companies inked in April. Carter said Sprint is marketing its wholesale capabilities to a variety of companies, including retailers and international carriers. Interestingly, Carter said customers of an unnamed Chinese carrier can get Sprint's handsets and service under the Chinese company's brand when they stay in the United States for prolonged periods of time. Donald Tan, president of China Telecom Americas, told Bloomberg in a recent interview that the telco will start selling wireless service in the United States under its own brand as an MVNO. Tan said that China Telecom, which uses the CDMA 2000 standard, is already in market trials with several potential wholesale partners, which he declined to name. For more:- see this Bloomberg articleRelated Articles:Sprint leans on low-income Assurance Wireless subs for growth China Telecom to launch U.S. MVNO in 2012 Sprint to wholesale Clearwire's WiMAX service to others
11-14-2011
AT&T reveals LTE Advanced plans

11-14-2011
How Catching More Fish Leads To Bigger Mobile-App Revenues

Summary
The main theme of the recent Open Mobile Summit in San Francisco was how to make money from the growing market for mobile applications. The big trend is a shift away from both premium content and advertising, and moving toward smaller incremental micropayments. Game operators are finding this shift makes it...
11-14-2011
MVNO Lycamobile unveils free calling incentive

Summary
Lycamobile, Europe's largest MVNO, is offering free and unlimited calls between its UK customers until Nov. 30. The company is offering the incentive to "accelerate" the growth of its UK MVNO operations. Commenting on the plan, Lycamobile CEO Milind Kangle said in a statement: "This unlimited free calls offer from Lycamobile to Lycamobile, demonstrates our continuous commitment to providing our customers with a high quality of service and fantastic value for money in this harsh economic climate." The company is said to have over 6.5 million customers across 14 countries including the UK, France, The Netherlands, Belgium and Switzerland. Lycamobile recently announced the launch this year of its third MVNO service in Poland, following launches in France and Germany, as part of the company's 132 million investment programme. Kangle said: "Our acceleration during 2011 has created significant distance between us and our nearest competitors which will only grow as we add further countries in 2011 and 2012." Separately, the French telecoms regulator Arcep released its quarterly update which highlighted the growing success of MVNOs. According to the agency 10.6 per cent of French mobile connections are now managed by MVNOs, compared to 6.9 per cent a year ago, and 5.6 per cent two years ago. Of particular note, MVNOs accounted for nearly 35 per cent of gross prepaid sales in the quarter, and for 18.7 per cent of all postpaid sales. For more:- see this Mobile News article- see this Mobile Europe article- see this Global Telecoms Business article Related Articles:China Telecom close to selecting European MVNO partnerOrange dumped as SFR scoops French MVNO dealFrench MVNOs want a more competitive marketRumour Mill: Google running MVNO test-bed in Spain
11-11-2011
Senate rejects effort to overturn net neutrality rules

Summary
The Senate on Thursday voted to block an effort to repeal the FCC's net neutrality rules for wireless and wired networks, the latest step in a series of legal and congressional maneuvers around the regulations. The vote, which fell along party lines, was 52-46 to reject a resolution to overturn the rules. The House passed a mainly symbolic measure in April to repeal the rules, which were published in the Federal Register in September after months of delay. Republicans want to repeal the rules, arguing that they are overly burdensome to telecommunications and wireless companies and that the FCC does not have the legal authority to enforce them. Democrats and the White House have defended the rules, and the Senate defeat of the resolution was cheered by public interest groups that have supported the regulations. Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.), chairman of the Commerce, Science and Technology committee, said that companies had helped shape the regulations. "These rules are the product of hard work, consensus and compromise," Rockefeller said in a statement. "So at the end of the day, the FCC's light-touch approach to network neutrality prevailed, and that is a good thing." Verizon Communications (NYSE:VZ) has sued to block the rules, arguing that they are unnecessary and that the FCC does not have the authority to make the rules. The rules were first passed by the FCC on a party-line 3-2 vote in December 2010 after months of contentious debate. Some supporters of net neutrality--particularly those at public interest groups--urged the FCC to enact stricter rules and reclassify broadband as a telecommunications service to give the FCC more authority over the topic, which the commission did not do. Under the FCC's rules, wireless carriers are barred from blocking services such as Google Voice and Skype that compete with their own voice and video offerings, as well as those in which they have an attributable interest. However, wireless carriers would not face the same restrictions wired operators will on blocking Web traffic and other applications--a ban on unreasonable discrimination in transmitting lawful network traffic. For more:- see this WSJ article (sub. req.)- see this Washington Post articleRelated Articles:FCC publishes net neutrality rules, likely sparking fresh lawsuits House votes to kill net neutrality rules Court tosses out Verizon, MetroPCS net neutrality suits on technicalityHouse Republicans challenge FCC's net neutrality rulesFCC tries to block Verizon, MetroPCS net neutrality challengesVerizon sues FCC over net neutrality rules
11-11-2011

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